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 @ The Astronomical Hobbyist 2016

The Astronomical Hobbyist

I am a keen watcher of the night sky (and sometimes the daytime sky as well) from my home garden, mainly using my 150mm Sky Watcher refractor on a EQ6 goto mount, along with a couple of grab and go smaller telescopes sitting on EQ3 goto mounts. As my garden is in the centre of a brightly lit south coast seaside town with plenty of street lamps around, I have to carefully choose what objects to locate, but this is part of the challenge. But all is not lost as you will be able to see in the following pages.

I am a member of
The British Astronomical Society
Eastbourne Astronomical Society
East Sussex Astronomical Society
The Local Group

I enjoy imaging the lunar surface with a webcam and more recently imaging other interesting sights with my Canon DSLR camera attached to one of my telescopes, with the occasional dip into deep sky viewing through the eyepiece using binoculars or telescopes. Or reading about the historical characters that shaped astronomy as we know it today. If you also live in a light polluted area, then please view the next few pages were you can see some examples of my work along with some pages of general interest.

Astronomy is a hobby that you can enjoy and spend as much time or money as you like, it is the viewing of the night sky that is the first objective. You don’t have to spend a fortune, as just a simple guide book and perhaps some binoculars are all that are needed to start with. Later, when you feel you would like to delve deeper into the subject, then thoughts can turn to telescopes and other equipment. Over the years I have gathered a lot of bits and pieces, much of it just sitting in boxes and not seeing the light of day (or night) so be careful and don’t get carried away. Also, don’t try and keep up with technology as you will find that you can acquire something one day, only to find that by the next day it is out of date.

The best way to learn your astronomy is to join your local astronomical society and talk about it to like minded people. I have found that all astronomers, whether amateur or professional, are only to pleased to engage in conversation about their favourite objects and theories.